RealSense And The Uncanny Valley

IDF 2014 was not the first time we’ve been honored to have a tech demo on the floor. And as we’ve been to the rodeo we’ve learned a thing or two about floor demos. First among those things: Keep It Simple Sherlock. So with that lesson in mind we created Cloak&Badger – a very simple game mechanic that splurged on the eye candy (a Cloak&Badgerwonderfully animated badger guard) and did exactly one thing: it used the recently updated RealSense (Beta) SDK and its emotion sensing API. The entire game worked as you made faces at the camera…that’s it…and it was a blast!

Cueing the player to what emotion drove the RPG-Style dialog tree in a particular direction was straight-forward and folks had tons of fun trying on the various emotive states that the API supports. (Includes:  Joy, Sadness, Disgust, Contempt, and Surprise plus the more general “sentiments” that are Positive, Neutral, and Negative.) By the rules of our KISS constraint it was an unqualified success and we had tons of smiles, laughs and genuine fun all week


Almost…
And then it went sideways.

Mobile is Dead. Long Live the PC!

Soma Games wrote our first line of game code at the tail end of 2008, just as the iPhone was really blowing up and as it happened, we were in the right place at the right time. It wasn’t on purpose, it was partly opportunistic, but it worked out. We rode that mobile wave for years and were part of the Indie Game Renaissance it helped generate. (See: Polygon, GDC, Wired)

What made mobile so attractive was, of course, the low barrier to entry but that was only what got us interested. What kept us interested was the demonstrated market for indie games. Hardware constraints initially leveled the playing field so big studios had a much less pronounced quality and scope advantage over small shops so nimble little shops like Soma Games could compete and still land a feature from Apple or get covered by Kotaku.

Now it’s 2014 and as far as I can tell, the mobile space is no longer interesting for indies. I’m not the only one either. (See: Gamasutra, and this…for a start.) In fact, just about everybody I got to know as other indie mobile developers in the last several years is coming to the same conclusion. Mobile is over, let’s do PC games.