IDF and My Wireless Dream

IDF is always a great place to get a glimpse of upcoming technology and while some portion of what you see there never quite makes it to the real market a trained eye can start to sense what ideas really have legs and are likely to keep going. This year, the stars that caught my attention were the consumer scale robots with Edison tech, and wireless everything.
CoolOffice

That Long-Overdue Redwall Update…

It was sixteen months ago that we posted our first blog regarding Redwall, or Project Mouseworks. Shortly thereafter we launched our AbbeyCraft kickstarter, it funded, and then roughly a year ago this month AbbeyCraft was released. All going well so far. The plan at that point, as far as we could see it, though shrouded in some pretty dense fog, was to wrap up a modest private funding effort, build a modest adventure game and then see what happened. It was a pretty straightforward plan and while Redwall was obviously a big thing, our goals were fairly short term and limited. But something happened on the way to that pivot and while it’s cost us some time I hope you’ll see it as something overall quite positive – I know we do.

Setback #1: If I’m honest, I was just horribly naive about how the private funding world works. I’d never done it before but with all things considered it felt like the right play as opposed to either a traditional publishing deal or taking a second draught at the crowd funding trough. I’ll certainly write more about this experience in the future but suffice it to say that I underestimated the time this was going to take. On its surface that sounds like a bad thing, it was certainly wretchedly frustrating at times, but as I’ll describe below I think it was actually a blessing in disguise.

RealSense Gestures: Reality and Wish Lists

As part of the continuing series covering our experience with the RealSense technology from Intel, I’ve been thinking about gestures…

I’ve been saying for a long time that one of the keys to Apple’s success in getting developer buy-in for iOS was the very approachable and well designed tool kit they provided in X-Code. It was as if they polled 100 random potential coders and asked, “If you made an iPhone app, what’s the first thing you would want to tinker with?” and then they made all of those APIs easy to find and easy to use. The result was a tool kit that rewarded you early for modest effort and thereby encouraged developers to try more, to get better, to learn more again and keep exploring the tool kit for the next cool thing. It made adoption of something totally new feel manageable and rewarding. That not only encouraged the curiosity crowd, but also the business-minded crowd who has to ask, “How long will it take to adopt this tech? And is it likely to be worth it?” So long as the first answer is “Not too much.” then the second question is less acute.
The point being: it enabled early adopters to show off quickly. That drew in the early followers and the dominoes fell from there.

RealSense would benefit greatly from this lesson. Hardware appears to be in the pipe and were adequately impressed by the capability – check. A Unity3d SDK (among several others) is looking really sharp – check. So now I’m thinking about the question, “…What’s the first thing I want to tinker with?” and probably 75% of my ideas revolve around gestures. In fact, gestures are probably the essential component of this input schema and as such, it will be make-or-break for Intel to make gestures easy to get started with and also deep enough to explore, experiment, and mod. But Easy needs to come first…

Expression or Outreach

StreetPreacherComing back recently from CGDC has me thinking again about something I always think about at CGDC – whether or not we’re the “black sheep” of that group…and if we are, is that a good thing or a bad thing.

Last year at the end-of-conference Town-Hall part, where everybody can basically bring up anything they want, Mikee Bridges from GameChurch said something that brought this idea back to the front of my mind. I don’t remember exactly what he said but it was something along the lines of “Are all of our [game projects] actually serving the function of outreach[1]?”

It’s a perfect question for Mikee. After all, GameChurch’s mission statement is one of outreach – specifically an outreach to gamers. But I was surprised at how quickly my mouth popped open and I said “that’s not what we’re doing…” And I’ve been pondering that brief exchange ever since.

RealSense Rubber Meets the Road

Continuing our series on Intel’s new/upcoming RealSense technology we recently got the alpha build of their Unity3D enabled SDK and a much improved version of the camera. While the package is cool and opens up a lot of interesting theoretical possibilities it got us thinking about the practical question surrounding this tech.

RealSense is, at its bottom line, an input device. In that sense it will be measured against things like joysticks, mice and game controllers and as a developer trying to make a living with this software we’ll be looking at several things beyond the “cool” factor. Things like:

  • Addressable audience
  • Typical hardware profile
  • Time/cost to implement
  • Processor overhead

When we’re being compensated to experiment and do basic R&D (And – full disclosure again – we are.) then we can ignore basically all of these considerations but when we move past that and start to explore actually deploying such tech…suddenly the calculus for deployment changes dramatically.

Redwall at GDC

I should have written this months ago, while all the memories were fresh, but sometimes you need a little time for an idea to find its place in your mind and sort itself out – perhaps this is one of those times.

A few months back we were at GDC in San Francisco. For the first time we took a risk and bought some booth space on the Indie floor sharing a slot with our friends at OmegaTech. Not being exactly organized we brought three things to show: a working build of Stargate SG1 Gunship, an alpha build of G Prime and a banner for Redwall. (Memo to self: next time try ‘focus’) G, for all the pretty screenshots, really wasn’t a good choice for a booth show – it’s more of a thinker really, and only alpha. SG1 showed pretty well. People seemed to like what we’d done with the UI, but far and away we had the most response to Redwall…even though we had nothing to show but a banner.

Seriously I was shocked…again. At times we had folks four and five deep around our tiny little table and at other times people were literally throwing resumes at us. Tweets and posts and selfies, all because of the way this series of books has touched people. There was a no-man’s-land of open seating adjacent to our booth and I could sit there inconspicuously watching as people would come up to the banner and take long pauses as if they were reliving fond memories. Sometimes they’d want to ask us questions but more often they just looked wistfully on at the sandstone walls and the setting rose-colored sun and seemed to be moved, almost to reverie.

Redwall Step 2: Ship It

Redwall AbbeyRedwall AbbeyCraft : The Corsair’s Last Treasure is live.

In case the point of that is lost, that means that the very first officially licensed Redwall video-gamish-thing is now out there in the wild. Bam!

If step one of our journey was to Shout It then step 2 was clearly to Ship It. In other words, we needed to come out with a win. When we were working on all the license deal for Redwall we found that the internet was littered with 15 years of false or failed announcements of various shows, movies, games, merchandise…you name it. Some of them were very professional and ‘real’ looking. Others were more plainly false. I can only speculate on the motives of those folks but whatever was intended we saw that the past as preserved on Bing presented us with an uphill PR challenge where fans were likely, and reasonably so, to say “I’ll believe it when I see it!” And while the success of the Kickstarter campaign was a good ‘win’ it ultimately only proved that we could rally some eyeballs and left open the question of whether or not we could build something that respected and embodied the spirit of Redwall.

To those Doubting Thomas’s out there – reach hither thy mouse and behold: Download The Corsair’s Last Treasure now!

Soma Games Selected by Praxis Labs

We just got some great news: Praxis Labs (FB/TW) has selected Soma Games as one of their 2014 ‘not-just-for-profit’ Fellows – and we’re…

Well, we’re a lot of things. We’re humbled. We’re jazzed. We’re honored. We’re incredulous. We’re proud. We’re scared.

Praxis Labs was launched in 2012 during Q Idea‘s annual conference when it was in Portland, OR – our backyard. Q is a kind of Christian TED, or a think tank that tries to make some ancient concepts practical and relevant to modern times and they have a central notion (which I agree with) that America, and probably the world, is in a ‘post-christian’ time and that insight requires people of faith to think about things in a very different way then we maybe did just 20 years ago. Praxis, like Q, also puts a premium on the ideas of ‘impact’ in a very practical incarnation – talk is cheap and spiritual feel-good talk can be both cheap and ultimately do more harm than good. Praxis Labs has seen ink in several high-profile publications like the Washington Post, the Huffington Post, and on Fox Business. Previous fellows include cutting edge enterprises like FigMatchbook LearningRare GenomicsTegu, and Care for AIDS just to name a few. And while I’m dropping names, the list of mentors who participate reads like a who’s-who list with a significant tilt toward toward high tech, including a partner at Kleiner-Perkins, and a co-founder of EA. In short – this accelerator program stands to put Soma Games in front of some really influential folks…can we handle it?

One Million Downloads! Now what?

One Million downloads…

When Soma Games was started I don’t think we had any idea that such a number was even a possibility. At other times, as we saw certain titles explode onto the scene with huge download numbers, a mere 7 figures seemed like a gimmie. Today, with both extremes more tempered by poise, we recognize the milestone as significant…but we’ve only just begun.

As I write this, the ‘news’ o the number is at least a few months old and it was something I’ve been meaning to note ever since then. No matter what it’s an auspicious event and worth pointing out. But have you ever come to a place that you thought was a destination only to find it was simply a checkpoint?