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Gaming and Intel’s RealSense

The Future?If you were watching at CES you may have seen Intel unveil their RealSense initiative. This is really an evolution of the Perceptual Computing initiative they pushed a year earlier but now with (vastly) improved hardware and software. We’ve been involved with this program for a while now, but wearing our Code-Monkeys hats, and we’ve even won a couple of awards. While we’ve written in the past about the tech I wanted to share a few thoughts about what we see in the future.

Hardware-free interfaces like RealSense and Kinnect are undeniably going to be more and more common in the coming years and for many reasons but maybe not the reasons that seem most obvious. That said, the experience of building this kind of UI also exposed its weaknesses which were a little surprising. Take Tom Cruise here on the right in the iconic scene from Minority Report. Take a pose like Tom here and hold it. How long before your arms wear out and fall to your side from flaming deltoids? The limit of physical endurance was something that took us totally by surprise when we started this but of course it should have been obvious and while we found it to be a very limiting factor working with existing control schemes it forced us to think differently about how we controlled these games, specifically aiming toward schemes that were more autonomous systems that coasted, needing occasional input instead of constant input.

Related to this was the matter of latency. No matter how ninja I get, moving my arm takes an astonishing amount of time compared to twitching my thumb. Ergo, any of the control schemes or game mechanics that required twitch controls were a non-starter using meat-space controls.

These are a couple of the limitations we saw but what I’m really excited about was how those challenges lead to exciting epiphanies!

RealSense and technologies like it invite us to consider a very different way of approaching our games, our data and all of our virtual interactions – and the magic of it all is in the appealing ability to treat these virtual worlds in the way we treat the real world using our hands, our voices, and the well-honed ability to recognize spatial relations. Input schemes can move increasingly away from buttons and joysticks and drill-down menus (after all, these were always mechanical metaphors for physical actions anyway) into modalities more like dancing or conducting a symphony. Our virtual spaces can operate and be organized just like our real spaces and screens are more like windows to other worlds than flat representations of flatland spaces or even the compression interface into three-dimensional, but largely inaccessible worlds.

F: The Storm RidersSo if it’s not clear – we’re very, very excited about where this tech is going and working with it in its infancy has been kinda mind-blowing.

For practical purposes, expect to see us deploying RealSense technology in Stargate SG1 Gunship (under the Code-Monkeys label) F:The Storm Riders, and Redwall: The Warrior Reborn. It’s too soon of course to rely on this input being available but we will definitely make the games to use this tech where it makes sense. (We considered a RealSense version of G, but it feels like a poor fit)

We’ll be at GDC in a couple of weeks and if this is something you’re interested in, stop by and we’d love to talk to you!

Posted 1 month, 2 weeks ago at 6:22 pm.

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MeeGo5 is what you meant to say Intel

Announcing MeeGo5I have about eight blog posts I wan to make coming out of the Intel Elements 2011 Conference, most of them positive. BUt one of these seems pretty time sensitive and I want to be part of the conversation out here so I’m going to do this now even if it’s only half baked.

Whoever is in charge – you cannot use the name Tizen – it’s about the worst possible marketing move possible at this moment.
Instead – call it MeeGo5 – and you’ll be celebrated instead of mocked.

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Posted 2 years, 6 months ago at 1:42 pm.

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On The Future of Game Publishing

by Gavin Nichols

The other day, Soren Johnsen posted a tweet that really caught my interest. He said
“The next console generation will be won by whoever understands why the Xbox Indie Games Channel did not become the iOS App Store.’
This is true in so many ways.

The iOS App store has enjoyed an unparalleled level of success since it launched a few years back largely because it managed to hit a golden combination of approachability by both developers and consumers, while simultaneously lifting the best to the top through a natural feeling review system. For the first time Joe Schmoe could take his idea, build it himself and publish it to millions of potential customers, all from his living room. Customers had access to hundreds of thousands of apps at their fingertips, instantly, anytime and anywhere, for an affordable price.

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Posted 2 years, 6 months ago at 12:01 pm.

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AppUp – A Big Idea That Takes Time

We’re here at Intel Elements 2011, a “one year later” event from where we first heard Peter Biddle lay out a rather large vision for the Intel AppUp Center. Without going back into the history and our previous thoughts on AppUp I find myself feeling increasingly invested in this thing. Far more than getting tied up in what AppUp is or is not, I’m fascinated by what AppUp wants to become.

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Posted 2 years, 6 months ago at 11:04 am.

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Developing AppUp Games Using Unity 3D

One of the most exciting and powerful tools available to the indie developer today is Unity 3D (http://www.unity3D.com), a wildly popular game engine that exploded in popularity when the iPhone app store roared into public prominence. The Unity 3D engine has become so popular in part because of its ease of use, powerful tools, and too-good-to-be-true pricing. We’ve raved about Unity as a tool in the past though so I wont get into all that again. Instead I’d like to look at one specific aspect of how Unity and AppUp work together in beautiful unison.

Big Lesson #1: Multi-platform is not an either-or concept. It’s emphatically an also-and concept.

One of the most valuable aspects of Unity 3D is its ability to deploy a single project to multiple platforms. By installing various plug-ins or a little ninja coding you can build one game that runs on everything from Mac and PC desktops, all manner of mobile devices and even in a browser. Today’s case in point will be our recent release of Bok Choy Boy and how we brought it to Intel AppUp (here) at the same time we launched to several other platforms including iPhone, iPad and a browser based mini-game.

IMHO the profound magic of the app store model, specifically places like AppUp, iTunes and the Android marketplace is a massive, instantaneous, global distribution network. So long as you plan for it up front there is no reason not to target ALL of these platforms at one time in order to create the widest possible exposure for your game…and in so doing try to take over the world…again. The reality is that you never know where a game will catch on. For example, when Bok Choy Boy launched we never expected the HUGE audience we garnered in China. Over half of the total downloads have been in a country that we weren’t even thinking of. In hindsight we can guess why the Chinese market liked it, but we would have lost a ton of customers if we hadn’t taken advantage of the globe spanning power of app stores like AppUp and planned for multi-platform distribution and used a tool like Unity 3D. So I could keep beating that horse but seriously…do this. Continue Reading…

Posted 2 years, 7 months ago at 12:08 pm.

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Intel AppUp 1 Year Later

It was exactly 1 year ago that we got our first taste of Intel’s AppUp Center when they launched the beta store at CES 2010. It was received with mixed reviews and nobody really knew what to expect from it.

What a difference a year makes.

AppUp Has Angry Birds

Note to Intel: Why does this page still say "Moblin?"

Today you look at the AppUp Center and right up front is what must be the biggest runaway hit game of 2010 – Angry Birds. What a huge coup! What a great “I told you so” moment. Congratulations to Intel – Peter, you called it man.

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Posted 3 years, 3 months ago at 10:18 pm.

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An Open Letter to Intel on The AppUp Center

The app store concept is not a product or a service. It’s a complete reset of the way ALL intellectual property will be sold, shared and distributed. It will completely reshape the world of books, music and software.

How can Intel’s ApUp Center thrive and dominate?
1. Make it Cheap
2. Make it Easy – More importantly, make it LOOK easy.
3. Improve on What Apple has Already Done Well
4. Never Mention MeeGo
5. (After you never mention it) Make MeeGo Beautiful and Bulletproof
6. Apple is Not Your Enemy – Google Is
7. Show Us The Money – But In Secret
8. Support MeeGo and Air. Drop Everything Else
9. Leverage and Cooperate With Existing Services
10. Encourage Other Forms of IP

And 11 – Embrace and celebrate the huddled masses of
disempowered Flash developers – they are your future.

Posted 3 years, 8 months ago at 3:52 pm.

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Computex: The Buzz, The Bombs, and the Booth Babes

“I just flew in from Taipei and boy are my arms tired…”

I wrote that line a month ago when it was hoped to be at least slightly true…So the “just” has now become a distant memory and I’m only now getting to this blog, but better late than never right?

Taipei 101The whole point of this article is to give a report on what I saw at Computex which was in Taipei (as always) June 1-5. Now in the spirit of full disclosure I should say right off the bat that I was only in Taipei because I was invited to go by a large semi-conductor outfit you’ve no doubt heard of. And since I really never read those NDAs I sign I really don’t even know if I can mention then by name here…but you’ll read between the lines no doubt (where Google will not). Anyway, it’s worth saying that these folks were very generous to lil’ol’ Soma Games, took great care of me and didn’t EVER stop feeding me! I swear I ate 13 times a day over there…which was a good thing.  I stood atop the 2nd highest building in the world, the Taipei 101 and was shocked to see that a Starbucks in Proto-China looks exactly like a Starbucks in Seattle – I just couldn’t really read the menu. But who cares right? ’cause I just know where “Americano Maximus Quad Shot” is on the menu anyway and everybody understands a pointing finger. Continue Reading…

Posted 3 years, 9 months ago at 12:06 pm.

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